Review: The Taste of Blue Light by Lydia Ruffles

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Picture courtesy of http://www.netgalley.com

Um….what was this book about? Seriously, I finished it last night and I just had to flick through the last few pages to remember what happened. Something about an art school…trauma…questionable consent issues…that was pretty much it.

So, in the spirit of turning every negative into a positive, this the perfect opportunity to do my first pared down bullet point review! Here goes!

The Storyline
– A teenage student (Lux) wakes up in hospital with no idea of how she got there; she just knows that she was on a night out then it’s all a blank
– She convinces her parents to let her return to her liberal arts boarding school despite her amnesia, migraines, obsessive behaviour, synaesthesia (where your senses get confused and you hear colours or see smells etc.) and other indicators of trauma
– She does literally no art despite the book spanning her final year of ART school and first job after graduation
– She has therapy where she just repeats “I can’t remember”
– She meets a boy and begins a relationship despite being clearly traumatized (more on this later)
– She’s eventually triggered by a painting (not hers) and remembers what happened
– She gets a job and has a relationship that breaks up
– She goes to see an exhibition made by an old flame
– The End.

Can you see why I forgot the storyline?

The Good Points
– It was quite an easy read
– It was very different to anything I’d ever read before (it’s questionable whether this is truly a good point)
– The was some representation of LGBTQ+ characters (although they didn’t have much agency)
– There was great representation of female friendships – this is probably the strongest point of the whole book
– There was realistic representation of drug addicts who looked like everyday people

The Bad Points
– None of the characters had any agency. They were all acting under other people’s orders
– As the main character, Lux was difficult to relate to. She did absolutely nothing to try to work out what had happened to her – which was understandable but didn’t make for an engaging storyline
– There was literally no point to many of the “interesting” things about the book. The main character had synaesthesia but it didn’t affect the plot in any way. The book was set in an art school but none of the main characters did any art AT ALL. 
– Insta-love
– The big reveal about What Happened That Night came two thirds of the way through the novel. That left one third with no suspense or intrigue

Stuff That Made No Sense
– The storyline. Surely if you can’t remember the night before you ask the people you were with?
– The outcome of What Happened and how it had been handled was fairly preposterous. Lux was deeply traumatised but was left with her friends to look after her and the occasional session with a counsellor?
– There was a photo that taken of the back of Lux outside the big famous building where she was an intern that went viral and yet no-one recognised her.
– This question suggested for a book group discussion of the novel;

“Did you find the book funny? Why is humour important to the story?”

Ermmm… are we talking about the same book? Was this meant to be a humorous take on trauma?

Stuff That Is Too Important To Bullet Point
I found the relationship between Lux and her sort of boyfriend Cal really troubling. Lux is obviously in a state of shock and is trying to process a harrowing ordeal. You can tell this from her behaviour, the way she talks, her physical symptoms, her appearance, the way that everyone is talking about her…she’s clearly very unwell and in desperate need of love and support. So, I think it’s pretty inappropriate for Cal to try to have sex with her, however much she encouraged him.

THIS IS NOT OK.

There’s even a scene where they start kissing (there’s a clear implication that they’re going to have sex) and she disassociates and floats out of her own body to look down on the scene. Thankfully, she stops the situation and Cal gets off her, but it’s the idea that he doesn’t even notice that she’s not actively engaged and enjoying herself that I found disturbing. I also especially disliked the fact that the author noted that Lux had had sex before – which enables her to live up to her reputation – like that has anything to do with it and clearly implies slut shaming. 

ALSO NOT OK.

Conclusion
– The plot was lacking in so many different areas that I wasn’t gripped at all
– The book petered out after the big reveal
– There were lots of things that didn’t make sense
– There was an issue with consent and slut shaming

Rating: 2/5 stars
A meandering plot, a reveal that came way too soon and questionable issues around consent meant that I really didn’t enjoy this novel.

Please note that I read this book for free via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks, Netgalley!

4 thoughts on “Review: The Taste of Blue Light by Lydia Ruffles

  1. hehe I’ve finished books where I’ve been like “what did I just read” before 😉 But on the plus side I really liked your pared down review! Ermm, yeah that storyline does sound forgettable (and a little ironic cos it’s an amnesia story 😉 ) It’s good that it was such an easy read and yay to positive friendships. But with an mc that was difficult to relate to that does sound like it’d be hard to like. Also instalove is always a turn off. And why set it in an art school at all if they’re not gonna do art? Umm yeah why was she just left to deal with her trauma? I can never understand why books have weirdly unrealistic plotlines like that. And it does sound like there were plenty of plotholes here. Ugh yeah, this does sound like it had some serious issues underlying it as well. Great review!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha, I didn’t get the irony of writing a forgettable book about amnesia! Oooh, maybe it was intentional and actually really clever…*thinks about it*…no, it was just a fairly rubbishy book. Thanks love!

      Liked by 1 person

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