Confession Time…



Books I haven’t read…yet.

As we all know, there’s too many books out there to be read in a lifetime (sob!) so you have to pick your reading material wisely. This inevitably leads to gaps in all of our reading histories, which got me thinking…which books do people expect me to have read that I haven’t? 

1. About 97% of the Classics



I just don’t get on with classic books by people like Charles Dickens or Jane Austen. I find them so hard to get into, they usually fail to hold my attention and I generally get frustrated at the way that the characters are so bound by societal norms that they can’t just say what they want and get on with it. Also, representation of any minority group is pretty much zero so I kind of get bored reading about very similar types of characters over and over. Am I being unfair? Probably, and perhaps there is more diversity out there than I realise but overall – not for me.

2. The vast majority of YA literature



I’m too bloody old to be interested in all that teenage angst! Again, there are some brilliant examples of YA books that I’ve really enjoyed (most recently, Illuminae) but books by the likes of John Green don’t really do it for me. I have a bit of a personal rule that if the main character carries a backpack, I’m out (she says whilst reading Wild, where the narrator’s backpack features so heavily it almost becomes it’s own character). What can I say, I’m a conundrum 😜.

3. Core texts for most schools


For some unknown reason, my school chose a) not to stream English lessons by ability, b) to devote as little time to English as possible and c) to make us read the most random books ever. This resulted in a woeful teaching standard and one very bored Lucinda. So whilst everyone I’ve ever met that’s roughly my age read books like Of Mice and Men, we got stuck doing Hobson’s Choice which is literally the most boring novel ever. We also had to watch the immensely dull film which was made in 1954, in black and white, which did nothing to improve my feelings for the story. In fact, the only interesting work that we did study was the poetry of Maya Angelou, which has stayed with me to this day. I recently read Of Mice and Men and it was great – no idea why we didn’t study it. 

4. Shakespeare


Again, we’re back to my “how is this relevant?” feelings about classic literature and also the emotional scarring caused by my senior school. I have memories of teachers who would rather make us watch the RSC televised “play” of Macbeth  – a group of hammy actors sitting in a circle reading their lines (no set, no costumes, just big shiny faces) than read the actual book. Possibly something I should revisit as an adult but as soon as I start reading all those doths and tis trues every fibre of my being shouts “NOPE!”

5. Any Harry Potter stuff that isn’t books 1 – 7



 The term “flogging a dead horse” comes to mind when I see all these HP spin off books, play scripts and tenuously linked additions to the Wizarding World. Either write something else entirely (I quite enjoyed The Casual Vacancy) or make up a new fantastical world and start a new series of books there. It seems such a shame that someone as talented as JK Rowling keeps getting dragged into all these watered down versions of her original (brilliant) series. 

So that’s mine – what are your bookish confessions? What famous books haven’t you read? Let me know in the comments!

21 thoughts on “Confession Time…

  1. I’m with you on a lot of these! I can’t believe how few classics I’ve actually read considering I studied English Literature at University haha. Great post πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I am with you on all of these except YA. Its not my favourite genre but I do like YA crime thrillers. Classics just don’t work for me either though. I haven’t even read the most famopus ones such as Jane Eyre yet. Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Omg I love the “backpack” rule with YA!! I really don’t like John Green books or any books that are like that, they really just don’t do anything for me though I can see why teens would love them. There is some YA fantasy I love though, because a part of me still loves the angst haha.

    And I 100% agree with you about HP!!!!!! I have only read books 1-7 and haven’t bought any of the special editions or any of the other HP books that have come out. HP has been ruined for me in a lot of different ways, and the whole flogging a dead horse thing is one of those reasons.

    There are too many famous books that I haven’t read yet, which really bums me. And new stuff keeps coming out that I want to read straight away…it’s so hard hahaha.

    Awesome post!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha thank you! I find YA fantasy more enjoyable but it can be hit and miss.

      Every time is see a new HP spin off it makes me sad, I really feel like the whole amazing original concept is being watered down.

      Yeah I really feel like I could do with all the authors in the world agreeing not to publish anything for the next few years so I could catch up lol πŸ˜‚

      Liked by 1 person

  4. hahaha I don’t have the backpack rule, but I’m with you on John Green πŸ˜‰ Yeah my schools didn’t stream English for some reason- which was why in one school, even if I had a good teacher I had to strain to hear over all the people running around the room and talking cos they just weren’t interested :/ So sucky that you got stuck with a bad book as well though!! Oh crikey- it’s such a shame you had such a negative experience of Shakespeare. I think the thing about Shakespeare that not a lot of people admit is that (while they’re amazing and can make the best productions) most of the time they’re done badly- I’ve sat through far more lousy productions than good ones and there’s a whole vortex of godawful tv/movie versions out there. The one thing I will say (from my extremely biased view) is not to let that make you give up on it entirely and even if it is better to see it performed, it’s still worth reading them from the text (especially if it’s going to save you the pain of watching a bad production) And on the question of how is it relevant- I think certain themes like being an outsider, discrimination, depression etc that are all explored within Shakespeare have never been more relevant πŸ˜‰
    I totally get what you mean on the HP front though- I think I’ve read a total of one of the spinoff books (and it wasn’t the cursed child- I never intend to read that)
    Awesome post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Well, there certainly wasn’t anyone at my school saying “oh, the foreshadowing!” πŸ˜‰ and yeah I know what you mean about struggling to hear above the general chit chat 😞

      Maybe for my “hard” book next year I’ll look at Shakespeare again but I’ve definitely been put off. It does seem silly that I live less than an hour away from Stratford and I’ve never seen any of his work performed live though. Something to think about…

      Thank you! 😘

      Liked by 1 person

      1. hahhahahahaaha!! Mostly people couldn’t hear me saying that over all the general chatter πŸ˜‰

        That’s fair- it’s just a shame that a lot of people have been put off like that. Oh that’s a pity (I’ve never been to Stratford- but I’ve heard that it’s good though!)

        You’re welcome! 😘

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You’d LOVE Stratford. You’d know more than the tour guides. Just look out for all the Americans looking the wrong way when they cross the road (no offence US people – I’m sure I’d do the same in your country).

        Liked by 1 person

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