Review: No Tomorrow by Luke Jennings

Genre: Thriller

Similar to: Something by John Le Carre or Ian Fleming 

Could be enjoyed by: People who liked book one

Publication date: 25th October 2018

No, you haven’t read this review before – this is the second instalment of the novels that the Killing Eve TV show was based on. To be honest, by the time I’d finished this book the show had deviated so utterly from the text that I wasn’t even sure if it had taken the book into account, was going to do so in the next series or if Pheobe Waller Bridge was just forging ahead with her own storylines from now on. I guess we’ll just have to wait and see.

In No Tomorrow, the main characters remain as in the first book; Eve Polastri (MI6 agent) and Oxana Vorontsova (Villanelle, sociopath and assassin). The two women are locked in a deadly game of cat and mouse, with Eve edging ever closer to Villanelle and the secretive organisation that she works for – only to find out the extent to which she’s been manipulated.

Oooh!

I’ll start with a nice positive – this book was far more coherent than the first one (Codename: Villanelle). The whole narrative flowed better, there was more content, the characters were more fleshed out. I mean, it’s still an overtly glamourous, ridiculously premised spy thriller so it’s never going to win any literary awards but it’s also super fast paced, exciting voyerism. You just have to remember to suspend your belief from time to time.

It was also nice to see a few glimpses of the humour of the TV series but unfortunately it was nowhere near as frequent or as well done. I thought that was such a shame because the TV series really does stand out for it’s quick wit and black humour. However, the book still retains a certain charm and is definitely a page turner. The characters are just as far fetched as ever but the way that Villanelle and Eve are drawn to each other is unique and even a tiny bit sexy. I mean, Eve still has stratospheric leaps of imagination (her instinct, ha! That must be why she’s female) and Villanelle survives some frankly bonkers murder scenes (spoiler alert: a leather suitcase does not provide much protection from a bomb blast) but the dynamic between the two women is fascinating. 

It did find it annoying that I couldn’t for the life of me work out where the book was in relation to the TV series. Like AT ALL. Some events didn’t happen, others were alluded to, some were fairly similar but meant that things that had happened in the TV series didn’t make sense. It doesn’t help that a few of the male characters in the book have been changed to women for the television. Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for diverse representation but it doesn’t make it easy when you’re reading ahead to find out what happens and you can’t even figure out who is who!

Overall, I enjoyed No Tomorrow a lot more than Codename: Villanelle and I’m looking forwards to seeing what happens next, both in text and on the television. I still prefer the TV series but the final chapter of No Tomorrow has set up a really interesting premise that I’m super excited about. I need to know what happens!

Rating: Four “don’t eat the banana if it’s got human remains on it” out of five.

Please note that I read this book for free via Netgalley in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks Netgalley! 

 

Review: Codename:Villanelle by Luke Jennings

Genre: Thriller

Similar to: Something by John Le Carre or Ian Fleming (IDK, I’m not a thriller fan)

Could be enjoyed by: People who’ve watched the TV series and would like to know what the hell’s going on

Publication date: 6th September 2018

To clear up any confusion: yes, this is the novel that inspired the Killing Eve TV series. However, the show deviates wildly from the book so if you’re a fan of the programme, be prepared. For those of you who haven’t seen it I’d highly recommend doing so because it’s bloody brilliant and one of those rare occasions where the adaptation is better than the source material (that’s something I’ve literally never said before). 

I digress…

Codename: Villanelle is a super sexy spy thriller, set in various glamorous locations all over the world. It’s your usual fare: a good cop character (Eve Polastri) is recruited to catch a sociopathic assassin (Oxana Vorontsova AKA Villanelle) who is working for a top secret consortium hell bent on creating a new world order. What’s different is that both the MI6 agent and the assassin are women. A bit one dimensional, yes and not brilliantly written but still, it’s nice to see female characters taking centre stage for a change. To be honest, their depictions could have been a lot worse (I don’t know anything about their breasts, for example) but I think that says more about the low bar that’s been set by other authors than the quality of the writing here.

Whereas the TV series elevates the (slightly generic) story from good to brilliant with the use of clever dark humour and a complex storyline, the book is far less amusing and has a more obvious narrative. The only positive is that the book does provide more of a back story for anyone who has watched Killing Eve and got a bit lost. You get to find out more about the consortium (The Twelve) and their ideas for the world which helps to place Villanelle’s actions within more of a logical setup. You also get to understand a bit more of her back story so there’s less of the “she’s just a sociopath, go with it” which seemed to be the image that the TV series presented.

On the plus side, the book is extremely fast paced and is a real page turner. It’s fairly short so easy to rip through and despite being a bit generic there’s something about the two main characters that’s utterly compelling. Villanelle is a ruthless killer utterly without remorse and although the book has softened her a bit, the things she got up to provided a great big dash of voyeuristic escapism. The cat and mouse games that she plays with Eve were creepy/enthralling in equal measure but I did find Eve’s leaps of logic a tiny bit wearing. From a multitude of options she seemed to guess correctly every single time, leading her in a direct line towards Villanelle. Hmmmmm.

Apart from the occasional need for the reader to suspend their disbelief, the only other thing that let the book down was the writing itself. I found the text somewhat clunky and as the book is four novellas smushed together the narrative flow is a bit start-stop. This can be jarring at times but the action ramps up quickly, helping to smooth out the obviously bumpy plot.

Overall, I found Codename: Villanelle to be exciting and fast paced but also kinda generic and dare I say it – a tiny bit trashy. Pheobe Waller-Bridge has done an absolutely terrific job in adapting the text for TV and if I were you, I’d definitely watch that first then read the books if you have a burning desire to get a bit more background info.

Rating: Two and a half “please put down the champers and drink some water” out of five.

Sexy, fast paced escapism – just don’t expect the brilliance of the TV series.

Please note that I read this book for free via Netgalley in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks Netgalley!